Author Topic: Work table done  (Read 446 times)

Offline okawbow

Work table done
« on: September 29, 2019, 11:17:34 AM »
Spent a day cleaning out the garage, and just finished my work table today. I built it 24 3/8” wide and 16’ long. There are three legs with lag bolts for leveling. It’s solid and level all around.

Offline Steve

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Re: Work table done
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2019, 12:56:01 PM »
A little photo editor help from Steve...

Offline okawbow

Re: Work table done
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2019, 01:00:11 PM »
Thanks!
I tried posting it sideways, but it didn’t help.

Offline scottiniowa

Re: Work table done
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2019, 12:24:11 AM »
Spent a day cleaning out the garage, and just finished my work table today. I built it 24 3/8” wide and 16’ long. There are three legs with lag bolts for leveling. It’s solid and level all around.
excellent,  and now is the perfect time to X brace your legs for side strength, and use 45 degree kickers or ply triangles for lateral movement strength. We all find ourselves wanting to move the bench a little, the extra strength allows this to happen easily with the added braces

In the simplest terms, picture what saw horses do when not braced.

Good Job
best email address:  irondesignairparts@gmail.com

Offline okawbow

Re: Work table done
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2019, 04:56:41 AM »
Thanks, Scott
The box construction around the I beam joists is very stiff and strong, but I’ll take your advice and add braces against side movement.

Offline kalazzerx

Re: Work table done
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2019, 07:24:25 AM »
Looks good but how wide are they?  For building the wings I went with a full 4-foot table set and built using EAA table design which was simple but strong.    Really need the width even nice size after building wing for other parts - that is if you have the room.   

Also mounted both of mine on rollers - really love them being on rollers - I move them around all the time.  Oh, I built two that I tie together with a couple of straps so I can also use them independently. 

http://buildlog.virtualmakerspace.com/2018/10/13/building-a-new-bench-longer-and-wider/

Offline okawbow

Re: Work table done
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2019, 07:35:16 AM »
I would prefer a 4’ wide table, but I’m building in a 11.5’ x 24’ garage and have to work around other things in the room.

I will make a 2.5’ x 2’ table out of the left over Ibeams and 2x4’s to move around for extra support if needed.

Offline kalazzerx

Re: Work table done
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2019, 07:39:53 AM »
Understand :(

Offline scottiniowa

Re: Work table done
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2019, 10:21:28 AM »
Looks good but how wide are they?  For building the wings I went with a full 4-foot table set and built using EAA table design which was simple but strong.    Really need the width even nice size after building wing for other parts - that is if you have the room. 

Also mounted both of mine on rollers - really love them being on rollers - I move them around all the time.  Oh, I built two that I tie together with a couple of straps so I can also use them independently.

http://buildlog.virtualmakerspace.com/2018/10/13/building-a-new-bench-longer-and-wider/
The hows/ways and what for's on tables have gone around for years.. but I will toss in my two cents from experience.

  • The narrow table- when it comes to laying out the frame work for welding is far easier to work around.
  • when it comes to wing work, by having this narrow table we put a cross piece on each end, that holds the spars firmly and strait with the table (if your table is strait, these cross pieces will be strait if done at a perfect 90 degrees to the table) 
  • This cross piece is attached well to your already level top.
  • This cross piece only holds the spars, to which your ribs will then be attached to.
  • We use 80/20 alum to hold everything just the way we want it. Very adjustable
  • you can make the spar holding block tall enough and rigid enough to allow attaching your wing strut pieces at the same time your building your wing
  • the cross pieces are in from each end, allowing you to do all end of spar work (both ends) 
  • placed right, they will NOT interfere with diagonals, or nose ribs
  • placed right you can use your measurement from the cross piece to ensure your spars are exactly where you want them.  

Of course you can do all this with a wide table as well, but many find it is not as easy.  I'm happy with what ever works the best :D

Best of success

One last thing, often when making either table, if you have 1" overhang of your plywood top, this give you an excellent clamping area if needed.  Using the I beams as shown by first posting, really makes for a true table top, and perhaps could be considered far easier to do so than the standard EAA table plans that has circulated for years. Nothing wrong with it, but if you can do  better with less effort.... just saying.
best email address:  irondesignairparts@gmail.com

Offline okawbow

Re: Work table done
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2019, 10:59:35 AM »
The I beams are very easy to use and make a flat, straight, and solid table. I cut the I joists to 15’ 9” to leave a 1.5” Lip on the ends. I cut 9 pcs of 2x4, 21 3/8” long and screwed them evenly spaced and square to the edges of the I beams. I then screwed 3 sets of 2x4 legs, 36” long to each end and the middle. I put a cross piece an inch and a half from the bottom of the legs. Also drilled a pilot hole in each leg and screwed in a lag bolt for level adjustment. I flipped the base upright and set the 2 pieces of 2’3/8” x 8’ MDF board on top. I set them evenly with 1.5” overhang all around. The top matches up with the edge of the legs. The lumberyard cut the board lengthwise for a small fee. I snapped a chalk line down the centerline of the I beams on the top, and screwed the top down. A slight adjustment of the lag bolts set the table perfectly level in all directions. A few extra cross braces and the table is rock solid.

The smooth, flat surface of the MDF board makes a good work surface. I may need to use a piece of thin sheet metal under the weld joints to prevent bubbling the surface of the board.

The whole process only took less than 2 hours by myself, and I could handle the materials fairly easily. Cost was about $100.

Offline okawbow

Re: Work table done
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2019, 05:56:00 AM »
The table has worked out very well so far. I have my spars glued up, and will get the last of the plywood glued on today. The straightness and flatness of the table helps a lot to make a straight flat spar.
I also have 16 of the ribs done so far and now have Scott’s drawings, so I can make the rest without needing to modify them later.